invalid corps film

Aloha! The Invalid Corps Goes to Hawaii!

Aloha! Yes, we are in Hawaii. The Invalid Corps team was proud to be invited to the 2016 Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity to talk about our film.

The Pacific Rim International Conference, considered one of the most ‘diverse gatherings’ in the world, encourages and respects voices from “diverse” perspective across numerous areas, including: voices from persons representing all disability areas; experiences of family members and supporters across all disability and diversity areas; responsiveness to diverse cultural and language differences; evidence of researchers and academics studying diversity and disability; stories of persons providing powerful lessons; examples of program providers, and; action plans to meet human and social needs in a globalized world.

This morning we presented the history of the Invalid Corps, told the stories of several soldiers, and gave a play-by-play of the Battle of Fort Stevens. We even got to talk in some detail about Aunt Betty.  Unfortunately, we had some technical issues but were able to show our trailer.

An exciting time but we can’t wait to get back home and back to work on the project!

Photo of Day Al-Mohamed presenting at PacRim. You can almost make out the photo of Armory Square Hospital on the screen. Thankfully, the dog was the only one sleeping
Day Al-Mohamed presenting at PacRim. You can almost make the soldiers in Armory Square Hospital on the screen. Thankfully, the dog was the only one sleeping during the talk.

PS The PacRim Conference also has an amazing disability film festival put together by Laura Blum with award winners like: Becoming Bulletproof, Margarita with a Straw, Right Footed (director Nick Spark was actually able to attend), and Touched with Fire presented by Spike Lee.

The Crowdfunding is Over but the Journey is Just Beginning (well, continuing actually)

The Kickstarter is officially over! 

Thank you everyone who donated and everyone who Liked, Shared, and Tweeted about the Invalid Corps and the Battle of Fort Stevens! This last month has been incredibly exciting for all of us on the Invalid Corps Team and we are tremendously grateful for all of your support. We’ve made 161 new friends, who together have pledged more than $9,000. Your enthusiasm and dedication got us to our goal early, and because of you, we could expand our ambitions and plan ahead towards production to ensure the best possible short film that captures the story of these men.
Thank You Written in Multiple Languages

Kickstarter First Stretch Goal Revealed! – Civil War Mail

A quick Update from our Invalid Corps and the Battle of Fort Stevens Kickstarter.  We’ve reached 90%! We are thrilled and humbled by the support we’ve received.  And now we have 13 more days to reach the full amount. Considering the closeness to our goal, we thought it prudent to unveil our first Stretch Goal.

Our first Stretch Goal is a simple one, and one we hope is in relatively easy reach: $8,000. We hope to entice more people to support this project and/or to consider backing at a higher level. Why? Because at its heart, the Invalid Corps documentary is about the content and the stories of these men. Additional funding will allow us to begin to pay for direct production and have higher production values – To get this done right.

It means being able to afford things like a professional sound editor; some compensation for musicians (we have a composer so this project will have an original score but musicians have to eat too); and being able to send a full crew out for additional interviews with historians and descendants of Invalid Corps members. As for those who may be wondering, what additional reward that may entail, I give you the paragraphs below. 🙂

Patriotic Union Envelope
Patriotic Union Envelope – Image: Postal Museum

Mail has always been very important to soldiers. During the Civil War, these fragile notes are what connected families and in many ways have continued to connect military families, even today. These letters tell a much more intimate story than our textbooks of generals and battles. And of course, as we know, many soldiers carried letters in their pockets, to be forwarded to loved ones if they were killed in action.

About 45,000 pieces of mail per day were sent through Washington D. C. from the eastern theater of the war, and about double that in the west, through Louisville. According to Bell Wiley’s “Billy Yank,” a civilian worker with the U. S. Sanitary Commission, who visited a number of units, reported that many regiments sent out an average of 600 letters per day, adding up to more than 8 million letters travelling through the postal system per month. Franklin Bailey wrote to his parents in 1861, that getting a letter from home was more important to him than “getting a gold watch.” (via Dave Gorski at CivilWarTalk.com)

In recognition of the role that letters played, with this first stretch goal, we will send each backer (at the $25 and up level) an actual piece of PHYSICAL mail. They’ll receive a custom postcard of Invalid Corps imagery via the US Postal Service. Sent the same way families mailed letters more than 150 years ago, this is our “letter,” in thanks.

Resources: http://about.usps.com/news/national-releases/2012/pr12_civil-war-mail-history.pdf

Don’t forget to visit our Kickstarter! We need your to help get the word out about this documentary.

 

Falmouth, Va. Group in front of post office tent at Army of the Potomac headquarters
Falmouth, Va. Group in front of post office tent at Army of the Potomac headquarters